The Clog

In the third installment of our ongoing series on Bob Hope's soft n' baffling college football zingers, we find our hero doing shtick with Mark Bavaro, ribbing a hulking and extremely country Bruce Smith, and looking small next to the giant, puffy steroid specimen who would later become "The Patriot" in the WWF.

0 comments

Further revelations of ridiculous and ill-advised Navy SEAL-style training practices haven't made the Pirates look any less sad, bad and unintentionall comic. But there is a positive side, in that these practices might get the Pirates sued someday. We can hope.

3 comments

As part of our (apparently) ongoing series on amazing old-ish videos of baseball people doing non-baseball things, here is Jim Leyland, in a white turtleneck, singing "Betcha By Golly Wow" very seriously and quite well.

0 comments

There is no reason, really, to be running a four-year-old video of Michael Cuddyer blowing Denard Span's mind with a Spring Training magic trick. But there's no reason why not to run it, either, really.

0 comments

A trip to the ballpark. Well, ballparks, but not intentionally. 

0 comments

How do the pros motivate? By watching harrowing YouTube videos of 1980s professional wrestlers breathing coke-y fire. Try it! You will probably not like it very much, but it will almost certainly scare the hell out of you.

3 comments

Never mind the practical consideration of trying to sleep while DeMarcus Cousins yells for the ball: all those easy jokes about the Sacramento Kings' newly re-named Sleep Train Arena are missing a much more intriguing angle. However odd the name might sound, this is a rare instance in which a pro team's sold naming rights could possibly provide some benefit for the community.

0 comments

In part two of our series on Bob Hope's soft n' baffling college football zingers, we find the comedy legend collaborating with Brian Bozworth, Jerome Brown, a bunch of beefy white guys with Lego-man hair, and the rest of the 1986 College Footbal All-American team. 

0 comments

In the final installment of our 5-part series on retractable roofs in Major League Baseball, we look take a look at the structures in the past, the present and the future. 

0 comments
#MULTIPLE#

Chase Field in Phoenix and Seattle’s Safeco Field are perhaps the quintessential examples of what retractable-roof stadiums should be: baseball-only parks with roofs that are used regularly, and built specifically, to respond to their respective town’s beautiful - if unpredictable - climates. Whether or not that has translated to success on the field or at the box office is a different story.

0 comments