Topic: Stadiums

December 30, 2013

One of the oldest and shabbiest stadiums in Minor League baseball is also, improbably or not, one of the best places to watch baseball in the country. That ballpark is Nashville's Herschel Greer Stadium, the product of Conway Twitty's mad real estate dreams and home to the Triple-A Nashville Sounds. If an upcoming vote in Nashville goes as expected, its days are numbered. This dispatch from Herschel Greer first appeared in The Classical Magazine: Being There.

November 11, 2013

A father, a son and the old ways of building a new stadium for a team that mostly doesn't need one.

September 16, 2013

Fans pay serious money and deal with the routine indignities of overbearing stadium security to go to NFL games because they love football. But who is it, exactly, that has made NFL games the way they are, and ensured that the experience is dominated by gargantuan, electricity-chugging HD screens? You already know.

September 9, 2013

While there's still time left in the season, and before the discourse gets too loud, why not escape into the consequence-free embrace of minor league baseball?

May 29, 2012

It's big, bold, goofy and as thorough Willy Wonka-fied as any sports stadium that has ever existed. But for all the conversation about new lime green home of the Miami Marlins, two questions remain: is it a good place to watch a ballgame, and how will it look years down the road?

April 23, 2012

Cash-strapped communities routinely pay through the nose to keep a pro-sports franchise in town. The justification has always been that a pro team brings other business and economic development. Studies have shown that this argument is false. Places like Newark want a professional sports team because it offers them a source of civic pride.  But can Newark afford sports?

January 12, 2012

For those who follow LSU, Arizona State, Texas and other near-perennial College World Series qualifiers, Rosenblatt Stadium had become a beautiful summer vacation home. But it had a much deeper meaning for the people of Omaha. For them, the polarizing decision to raze the ’Blatt and relocate its tenants has felt more like a high-stakes battle for the soul of a modest midwestern city.