Topic: Old Jokes

November 30, 2012

Part seven of our occasional series revisiting the peculiarly joke-like antics of Bob Hope and that year's All-American college football team. This installment finds Hope doing shtick with John Elway, making jokes about Bruce Matthews' butt, and comparing Eric Dickerson to Reagan budget chief David Stockman. So kind of the usual.

November 9, 2012

In the fifth installment of our ongoing series on Bob Hope's endearingly baffling college football zingers, we intersect the time-space-Hope continuum in the year 1989, with Nick Fury impostor Andre Ware, speed demon Rocket Ismail and apparent anti-abortion activist Tripp Welborne.

November 2, 2012

In the fourth installment of our ongoing series on Bob Hope's gently baffling and profoundly cornball college football zingers, we rejoin our hero in the year 1984, when George Orwell's dystopian vision of a Brigham Young national championship was realized, and Bob met future star Billy Sims, future pro wrestling bad-ass Ron Simmons, and Steve McMichael, who was sort of both.

October 26, 2012

In the third installment of our ongoing series on Bob Hope's soft n' baffling college football zingers, we find our hero doing shtick with Mark Bavaro, ribbing a hulking and extremely country Bruce Smith, and looking small next to the giant, puffy steroid specimen who would later become "The Patriot" in the WWF.

October 19, 2012

In part two of our series on Bob Hope's soft n' baffling college football zingers, we find the comedy legend collaborating with Brian Bozworth, Jerome Brown, a bunch of beefy white guys with Lego-man hair, and the rest of the 1986 College Footbal All-American team. 

October 12, 2012

Every year, in the 1970s and '80s, Bob Hope went on television and dropped one-liners on the various members of that year's AP College Football All-American team. It was about as funny as that sounds, but also a good deal weirder.

July 9, 2012

Williamsburg Night at the Brooklyn Cyclones was promoted as "Hipster Night," online and elsewhere. Instead it was, quite understandably and quite enjoyably, just another minor league baseball game in Brooklyn. What else could it have been?