Topic: History

February 14, 2012

A few weeks ago, my son Isaac was ejected from a basketball game. It all started with Pistol Pete Maravich. 

February 8, 2012

James Naismith invented basketball, and John McLendon Jr. revolutionized it with the fast break. But when McLendon first enrolled the University of Kansas in the 1930's, Director of Phys Ed Naismith proved an important ally in fighting against segregation away from the court.

February 1, 2012

The league's latest campaign has already spawned a host of imitators. That had to be the point, right? 

January 13, 2012

Paris has never had a soccer team befitting its image of itself as the center of the world. For 40 years, Paris Saint-Germain Football Club has failed to live up to the lucrative standard of the rest of the city. Despite underperforming teams and a largely working-class fan base, the club has always seemed like it should give its owners a license to print money. The question then: can you gentrify a team? PSG did what unscrupulous developers have done for decades: They changed the rules, preyed on fears of crime, and cynically played for a newer, richer kind of fan. The fifth of a five-part series examining what happens to a football club when everyone’s eyes have turned to €€. 

January 12, 2012

For those who follow LSU, Arizona State, Texas and other near-perennial College World Series qualifiers, Rosenblatt Stadium had become a beautiful summer vacation home. But it had a much deeper meaning for the people of Omaha. For them, the polarizing decision to raze the ’Blatt and relocate its tenants has felt more like a high-stakes battle for the soul of a modest midwestern city.

January 12, 2012

Paris has never had a soccer team befitting its image of itself as the center of the world. For 40 years, Paris Saint-Germain Football Club has failed to live up to the lucrative standard of the rest of the city. Despite underperforming teams and a largely working-class fan base, the club has always seemed like it should give its owners a license to print money. The question then: can you gentrify a team? PSG did what unscrupulous developers have done for decades: They changed the rules, preyed on fears of crime, and cynically played for a newer, richer kind of fan. The fourth of a five-part series examining what happens to a football club when everyone’s eyes have turned to €€. 

January 11, 2012

Paris has never had a soccer team befitting its image of itself as the center of the world. For 40 years, Paris Saint-Germain Football Club has failed to live up to the lucrative standard of the rest of the city. Despite underperforming teams and a largely working-class fan base, the club has always seemed like it should give its owners a license to print money. The question then: can you gentrify a team? PSG did what unscrupulous developers have done for decades: They changed the rules, preyed on fears of crime, and cynically played for a newer, richer kind of fan. An in-depth examination of what happens to a football club when everyone’s eyes have turned to €€. 

January 11, 2012

Paris has never had a soccer team befitting its image of itself as the center of the world. For 40 years, Paris Saint-Germain Football Club has failed to live up to the lucrative standard of the rest of the city. Despite underperforming teams and a largely working-class fan base, the club has always seemed like it should give its owners a license to print money. The question then: can you gentrify a team? PSG did what unscrupulous developers have done for decades: They changed the rules, preyed on fears of crime, and cynically played for a newer, richer kind of fan. The third of a five-part series examining what happens to a football club when everyone’s eyes have turned to €€. 

January 10, 2012

Darts, currently in the middle of its world championship season, is a big deal. Big enough to have not one but two international showcases of note, and big enough to turn what's generally a barroom pastime into high drama. It's also proof that a sport can't afford to forget where it came from. 

January 10, 2012

Paris has never had a soccer team befitting its image of itself as the center of the world. For 40 years, Paris Saint-Germain Football Club has failed to live up to the lucrative standard of the rest of the city. Despite underperforming teams and a largely working-class fan base, the club has always seemed like it should give its owners a license to print money. The question then: can you gentrify a team? PSG did what unscrupulous developers have done for decades: They changed the rules, preyed on fears of crime, and cynically played for a newer, richer kind of fan. The second of a five-part series examining what happens to a football club when everyone’s eyes have turned to €€.