Topic: Class

June 11, 2012

Since 2010, the Oakland A’s have marketed themselves as “Green Collar Baseball." Setting aside the fact that Oakland’s jerseys don’t really have collars, and if they do, they’re not green, this slogan nails the A’s. Although the phrase “green collar” is scooting its way toward a dictionary definition, albeit a sort of dumb, imprecise journalistic one—which is not at all the same thing as “blue collar,” which the A’s also do not have, it's fair to say the late-Moneyball-era A's have a pretty good claim to working-class status.

January 13, 2012

Paris has never had a soccer team befitting its image of itself as the center of the world. For 40 years, Paris Saint-Germain Football Club has failed to live up to the lucrative standard of the rest of the city. Despite underperforming teams and a largely working-class fan base, the club has always seemed like it should give its owners a license to print money. The question then: can you gentrify a team? PSG did what unscrupulous developers have done for decades: They changed the rules, preyed on fears of crime, and cynically played for a newer, richer kind of fan. The fifth of a five-part series examining what happens to a football club when everyone’s eyes have turned to €€. 

January 12, 2012

Paris has never had a soccer team befitting its image of itself as the center of the world. For 40 years, Paris Saint-Germain Football Club has failed to live up to the lucrative standard of the rest of the city. Despite underperforming teams and a largely working-class fan base, the club has always seemed like it should give its owners a license to print money. The question then: can you gentrify a team? PSG did what unscrupulous developers have done for decades: They changed the rules, preyed on fears of crime, and cynically played for a newer, richer kind of fan. The fourth of a five-part series examining what happens to a football club when everyone’s eyes have turned to €€. 

January 11, 2012

Paris has never had a soccer team befitting its image of itself as the center of the world. For 40 years, Paris Saint-Germain Football Club has failed to live up to the lucrative standard of the rest of the city. Despite underperforming teams and a largely working-class fan base, the club has always seemed like it should give its owners a license to print money. The question then: can you gentrify a team? PSG did what unscrupulous developers have done for decades: They changed the rules, preyed on fears of crime, and cynically played for a newer, richer kind of fan. The third of a five-part series examining what happens to a football club when everyone’s eyes have turned to €€. 

January 10, 2012

Paris has never had a soccer team befitting its image of itself as the center of the world. For 40 years, Paris Saint-Germain Football Club has failed to live up to the lucrative standard of the rest of the city. Despite underperforming teams and a largely working-class fan base, the club has always seemed like it should give its owners a license to print money. The question then: can you gentrify a team? PSG did what unscrupulous developers have done for decades: They changed the rules, preyed on fears of crime, and cynically played for a newer, richer kind of fan. The second of a five-part series examining what happens to a football club when everyone’s eyes have turned to €€. 

January 9, 2012

Paris has never had a soccer team befitting its image of itself as the center of the world. For 40 years, Paris Saint-Germain Football Club has failed to live up to the lucrative standard of the rest of the city. Despite underperforming teams and a largely working-class fan base, the club has always seemed like it should give its owners a license to print money. The question then: can you gentrify a team? PSG did what unscrupulous developers have done for decades: They changed the rules, preyed on fears of crime, and cynically played for a newer, richer kind of fan. The first of a five-part series examining what happens to a football club when everyone’s eyes have turned to €€. 

November 10, 2011

The status of players-as-proletariat has been one of the key ironies of the lockout, and it hasn’t gone unnoticed: one of the most echoed complaints about the whole affair has been that “billionaires are telling millionaires they make too much money.”