Author Bio & Stories

  • Over twenty years, Nike's soccer ads have traced a change in what global athletic celebrity means. Virtues like teamwork and unity are praised, but the praise is drowned out by the positioning of athletes as disposable corporate deities.

  • FIFA wanted vibrant culture and masses in the streets during this World Cup. Unfortunately for them, they got both earlier than anticipated. The party is happening alright, but it’s made up of people who are fed up with government mismanagement and fealty to FIFA’s demands. In that spirit, what follows is the beginning of a playlist to accompany a proper World Cup gathering.

  • March 18, 2014
    Society and Soccer

    In 1887, only two years after the English Football Association first permitted “professionals” to play for clubs, a German sociologist  published a book called Gemeinschaft und Gesselschaft. More than eight decades later, a British sportswriter published a book about Tottenham Hotspur called The Glory Game. The two books have more in common than you might think.

  • January 13, 2012
    Paris is Earning, Part 5

    Paris has never had a soccer team befitting its image of itself as the center of the world. For 40 years, Paris Saint-Germain Football Club has failed to live up to the lucrative standard of the rest of the city. Despite underperforming teams and a largely working-class fan base, the club has always seemed like it should give its owners a license to print money. The question then: can you gentrify a team? PSG did what unscrupulous developers have done for decades: They changed the rules, preyed on fears of crime, and cynically played for a newer, richer kind of fan. The fifth of a five-part series examining what happens to a football club when everyone’s eyes have turned to €€. 

  • January 12, 2012
    Paris is Earning, Part 4

    Paris has never had a soccer team befitting its image of itself as the center of the world. For 40 years, Paris Saint-Germain Football Club has failed to live up to the lucrative standard of the rest of the city. Despite underperforming teams and a largely working-class fan base, the club has always seemed like it should give its owners a license to print money. The question then: can you gentrify a team? PSG did what unscrupulous developers have done for decades: They changed the rules, preyed on fears of crime, and cynically played for a newer, richer kind of fan. The fourth of a five-part series examining what happens to a football club when everyone’s eyes have turned to €€. 

  • January 11, 2012
    Paris is Earning

    Paris has never had a soccer team befitting its image of itself as the center of the world. For 40 years, Paris Saint-Germain Football Club has failed to live up to the lucrative standard of the rest of the city. Despite underperforming teams and a largely working-class fan base, the club has always seemed like it should give its owners a license to print money. The question then: can you gentrify a team? PSG did what unscrupulous developers have done for decades: They changed the rules, preyed on fears of crime, and cynically played for a newer, richer kind of fan. An in-depth examination of what happens to a football club when everyone’s eyes have turned to €€. 

  • January 11, 2012
    Paris is Earning, Part 3

    Paris has never had a soccer team befitting its image of itself as the center of the world. For 40 years, Paris Saint-Germain Football Club has failed to live up to the lucrative standard of the rest of the city. Despite underperforming teams and a largely working-class fan base, the club has always seemed like it should give its owners a license to print money. The question then: can you gentrify a team? PSG did what unscrupulous developers have done for decades: They changed the rules, preyed on fears of crime, and cynically played for a newer, richer kind of fan. The third of a five-part series examining what happens to a football club when everyone’s eyes have turned to €€. 

  • January 10, 2012
    Paris is Earning, Part 2

    Paris has never had a soccer team befitting its image of itself as the center of the world. For 40 years, Paris Saint-Germain Football Club has failed to live up to the lucrative standard of the rest of the city. Despite underperforming teams and a largely working-class fan base, the club has always seemed like it should give its owners a license to print money. The question then: can you gentrify a team? PSG did what unscrupulous developers have done for decades: They changed the rules, preyed on fears of crime, and cynically played for a newer, richer kind of fan. The second of a five-part series examining what happens to a football club when everyone’s eyes have turned to €€. 

  • January 9, 2012
    Paris is Earning, Part 1

    Paris has never had a soccer team befitting its image of itself as the center of the world. For 40 years, Paris Saint-Germain Football Club has failed to live up to the lucrative standard of the rest of the city. Despite underperforming teams and a largely working-class fan base, the club has always seemed like it should give its owners a license to print money. The question then: can you gentrify a team? PSG did what unscrupulous developers have done for decades: They changed the rules, preyed on fears of crime, and cynically played for a newer, richer kind of fan. The first of a five-part series examining what happens to a football club when everyone’s eyes have turned to €€.