Articles

There were many ways Stephen Curry's story could have gone wrong. The Warriors star could have been Randolph Childress, or Walter Berry, or Trajan Langdon. Instead, he turned out to be Stephen Curry.

A little over a year after it took over New York and induced a month-long high-five orgy, we're still trying to figure out Linsanity. Robert Silverman and Jim Cavan, two of the authors of the new book "We'll Always Have Linsanity," may not quite have figured it out, but they did enjoy themselves (and learn some stuff) in the process of looking back.

Gerald Wallace has been one of the NBA's highest-flying and most admirable players for a decade, playing with a heedless force that was bound to wear him down. But no one expected him to come back to earth quite as quickly, and painfully, as he has this season.

How some smart coaching and basketball's first jumpshot helped the University of Wyoming's basketball team beat everybody that mattered in college basketball, create the game we know today, and deliver a little bit of happiness in the middle of a World War.

Tom Breihan

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The biggest money match in history -- last year's John Cena vs. The Rock "Once in a Lifetime" main event -- will have its Twice-in-a-Lifetime sequel. When you throw in a dancing sociopath, more than a few Jurassic Park parallels and CM Punk wiping the fake ashes of the actually-dead Paul Bearer on him in preparation for his match with The Undertaker, it's no wonder people are predicting that this will be the biggest show in the history of the event. Our interpid reporters Tom Breihan and Nick Bond will do their best to prepare you. 

The Davis Cup can be one of the greatest and rowdiest tennis experiences out there. So why is the USTA so content to play it in front of tiny audiences, like the one it's almost certain to find this weekend in Boise?

Despite his claims to the contrary there's a pretty good case to be made that Sunderland FC's newest manager, Paolo Di Canio, is at least sort of a fascist. A wee bit of the iron fist never hurt anybody, right? 

One of the dirty little secrets football fans don’t like to talk about is that, in the game, a lot of things happen by accident. Xavi Hernández is the antidote to all that.

A fleeting moment of happiness in Queens on Opening Day, near the chop shops, amid the swirling on-field garbage and omnipresent Mets-fan anxiety, and in defiance of games two-through-162.

Topps chose "Chasing History" as its dominant factoid-theme for this year's baseball card set. It's a nice idea, if not terribly well executed, but also a worthwhile reminder of both how outsized baseball's bizarre past is and the importance of context.