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He spent years in the hoops wilderness, and several years on the bench proving it, but Will Bynum is good enough to have a job in the NBA. He's just the sort of player whose lot is to continually apply for the job he already has.

A bad call at a worse time will presumably prevent England from winning the Champions League trophy. It's not the first time a ref has made a mistake that cost a team a chance at glory, but it happens more in soccer than it feels like it should. Or at least that's what the death threats that the refs get would make you think.  

An impractical guide to the new and surprising NBA rule interpretations that will arrive during this year's NBA Playoffs. "Traveling" has never been so complicated, so simple, so vast or so terrifying.

Before the World Baseball Classic, slightly after the actual fall of the Soviet Union, and definitely on inexpensive Canadian locations, one baseball movie dared to ask: could David Mamet's favorite actor coach a ragtag bunch of Soviet athletes to semi-competence?

Pro wrestling demands an unusual suspension of disbelief, but Efedding—online, role-playing virtual wrestling—requires something more profound of the people who are obsessed with it: actual, total belief in the wrestlers and rivalries that they've collaborated in making up.

Some may say that athletes make too much money. While there are certainly players that help support that argument,  in the case of players like LeBron James, this couldn't be more wrong. So, why does the NBA restrict how much he can be paid? 

Finally, buddy-cop movie that's secretly a long satirical skit about the NHL, in which a mismatched pair of francophone and anglophone Canadian cops team up to solve a murder and realize, in the process, that they both really hate Gary Bettman.

Why does Basketball Twitter like a super-stylized ABC Family show about chatterboxing ballet dancers? For the same reason it likes basketball, mostly.

Cavaliers fans have, out of necessity, a strange relationship with Anderson Varejao. He plays hard, weirdly and reliably well, which makes him fun to watch. But the better he plays, the more appealing a trade piece he becomes for a team that's still rebuilding. How can fans love a player so much and spend so much time thinking about trading him?

There's nothing wrong with some idle speculation on the NCAA Tournament, especially as March approaches. But a little bit less of ESPN Bracketologist-in-chief Joe Lunardi, and the silly, over-certain pseudoscience he sells, might do us all some good.