Articles

Some good games, some bad games, the amazing Jaguars against the actualy amazing Broncos, all played comfortably in the shadow cast by the many problems of an increasingly, incredibly complicated entertainment.

Sportswriting as we know it more or less began in Chicago. From Black Sox to Three-Peats: A Century of Chicago's Best Sportswriting from the Tribune, Sun-Times, and Other Newspapers, a new anthology of Chicago sportswriting edited by the veteran columnist Ron Rapoport, shows how sportswriting grew up, and grew with the times, in the Windy City.

On the Champions League, aesthetics, branding, the vague but deeply felt subliminal effects of a great-looking soccer pitch and the profound, strange significance of groundskeeping.

Grantland Rice's famed "Four Horsemen" column about Notre Dame's college football team is one of the most storied and legendarily purple pieces of sportswriting ever. So we translated it into American English, in an attempt to figure out what it's actually about.

Sad parking lots, the joys of Russell Wilson running around terrified, and a children's book called J.J. Watt The Patriotic Violence Mountain. Also some predictions for the NFL's Week 5 slate of games.

Years after his last game with the Charlestown Chiefs, the team's reluctant star has stripped away everything he didn't need. What's left is just Ned Braden. A selection from the upcoming issue of The Classical Magazine.

Despite the warnings -- from their parents and their yuppie friends -- a schoolteacher and a writer went to Detroit on their trip across America. What they found there was a city, lonely and beaten down. But not defeated. And looking  forward to the next Tigers game. 

The New York Islanders have been both great and greatly sad during their decades on Long Island. What they'll be after making the move to Brooklyn is anyone's guess, but the transition is already happening.

Mariano Rivera is at the end of a long and consistently dazzling career. We won't be able to remember as much of it as we might want to, but that's the way baseball -- and everything else -- works.

A strategic cockney accent from Roger Goodell, some lessons from a good new book by a former NFL tight end, the continuing cosmic be-thwartment of Brandon Weeden, and also some NFL games, predicted.