Articles

Yes, it's frustrating when NBA players insist on acting like reasonable people and sign the richest possible deals as free agents, context be damned. But there is a time and place for taking a discount. These particular examples are not at all examples of that, but still.

Marv Levy sings, the Jets are shouted about for hard-to-discern reasons, and a journey to the heart of the Jacksonville Axis of Sads. Also predictions for this week's slate of NFL games.

At it's best, it's ike following a real-time, real-life Friday Night Lights, right down to the appreciation of the mundane, the athletic struggles, the triumphs, irrational fans, obnoxious competitors and loving marriages.

Beers, bets, greyhounds running on television, and a confrontation with existential uncertainty. Welcome to Florida.

Cycling has been a defiantly, narrowly European sport for a long time. That's changing, as of course it would and should, thanks to a crop of promising new riders from South America and Africa. It's not at all clear how ready cycling is for that, but change is coming all the same.

Karl Sides is a man and a St. Louis Rams fan. He is also a heavily costumed, widely recognized and carefully branded superfan named Ram Man, which is something else entirely.

 A national team is still just a team. It can’t get by on the trappings of nationality alone. Sharing a nationality with the players is no substitute for sharing a sense of purpose with them. You need to know that when you look at them, they will sometimes look back at you. Otherwise, why does a team exist at all?

Philip Rivers will pump his ROOM, the Seahawks will never look the part, and a little-known Peyton Manning factoid you won't get anywhere else. Also some predictions about this week's slate of NFL games.

The second part in our occasional series finds Theodore Roosevelt opining on The Schiano Men, Thomas Nagel investigating responsibility and Tony Romo, and an actual Kierkegaard quote applied to the Jaguars, which enhances the depressing aspects of both, somehow.

In the days of kayfabe, wrestling journalists always kept up the ruse, treating the act like a sport. But as public perception of the medium shifts from an athletic contest to high-impact theater, it's time for the people writing about it to follow suit.