Articles

The era of the broadcast made-for-TV movie event is probably over. But if it ended with Holly Hunter beating Ron Silver in straight sets in When Billie Beat Bobby, a not-quite-noble genre at least went out in style.

With the College Football Kickoff(TM) starting tonight, we enter another year of shouty debates on the nature of amateurism in a multi-billion dollar industry, academic probations and players with glowing red flags attached to them sitting in the backfield of some of the nation's best teams. Michael Dyer may be one of those players, but why should coaches like Louisville's Charlie Strong care?

David Roth

 et al.

Traveling through time with Steve Trachsel, conjuring Kirk Gibson, getting on a conga line with Yasiel Puig, and getting to yes with the inevitability of great pitchers missing a year of their prime and puffy radio meats getting mad about it. It's a lot, but baseball is a lot.

A day at the Little League World Series, complete with kids playing baseball and engaging in ad hoc sledding, happy parents a long way from home, a man in a french fry costume being photographed by a Honda employee, and a great many sponsors surrounding a perfect kid-sized baseball diamond.

I don’t often dress up for Halloween, but then I don’t often lose golf games to Charles Barkley either. In 2012, I did both.

Barkley’s a bit richer than I, so when we wager, the currency is humiliation. Before we played our annual game in September, he reminded me that we’d be sitting front row with Dr. Jack Ramsay at the Sixers’ season opener on Halloween. The loser, we decided, would have to attend the game dressed as Big Shot, the former Sixers mascot.

In Argentina, the longstanding and supremely heated rivalry between Boca Juniors and River Plate means a lot. But that doesn't mean just anyone can get into it. 

Science has a name for the strange tingly sensation you got while teachers told stories in school: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response, or ASMR. As it turns out, sports has a strange capacity for delivering that very sensation. Just not when or where you might think.

When the Nationals signed him to a nine-figure contract in 2010, Jayson Werth was just a highly questionable free agent signing. In 2013, Werth and his deal seem to represent the weird, wholesale stalemate of what should by rights be one of baseball's better teams.

A conservative sport run by a cabal of myopic middle-aged men in a remote location far from the media’s prying eye and which, until recently, determined its champion through arcane rankings as indecipherable to the common fan as reading runes. And now, finally, after many false starts, it will have playoffs. It's cricket. What sport did you think we were talking about?

No one really talks about loving sports bars. Very few of us actually do, and for very good reason. And yet these shabby, TV-jammed places are where we go to get something we need, and so something like home.