Articles

Grantland Rice's famed "Four Horsemen" column about Notre Dame's college football team is one of the most storied and legendarily purple pieces of sportswriting ever. So we translated it into American English, in an attempt to figure out what it's actually about.

Sad parking lots, the joys of Russell Wilson running around terrified, and a children's book called J.J. Watt The Patriotic Violence Mountain. Also some predictions for the NFL's Week 5 slate of games.

Years after his last game with the Charlestown Chiefs, the team's reluctant star has stripped away everything he didn't need. What's left is just Ned Braden. A selection from the upcoming issue of The Classical Magazine.

Despite the warnings -- from their parents and their yuppie friends -- a schoolteacher and a writer went to Detroit on their trip across America. What they found there was a city, lonely and beaten down. But not defeated. And looking  forward to the next Tigers game. 

The New York Islanders have been both great and greatly sad during their decades on Long Island. What they'll be after making the move to Brooklyn is anyone's guess, but the transition is already happening.

Mariano Rivera is at the end of a long and consistently dazzling career. We won't be able to remember as much of it as we might want to, but that's the way baseball -- and everything else -- works.

A strategic cockney accent from Roger Goodell, some lessons from a good new book by a former NFL tight end, the continuing cosmic be-thwartment of Brandon Weeden, and also some NFL games, predicted.

On an otherwise unremarkable late-season night, with two teams in very different circumstances playing each other, history might have been made. A baseball game happened instead.

Albert Camus on the Jaguars. Glenn Beck on the Jets and sort of on the debt ceiling. Doctor Seuss on LeGarrette Blount. The first in an occasional series in which great thinkers provide their takes on recent NFL action, because a great and complicated game deserves great and complicated analysis.

High school sports are, at least in a few parts of the country, a big deal. But what makes them great has more to do with how small and human-scale and warts-and-all beautiful they remain.