Articles

The second part in our occasional series finds Theodore Roosevelt opining on The Schiano Men, Thomas Nagel investigating responsibility and Tony Romo, and an actual Kierkegaard quote applied to the Jaguars, which enhances the depressing aspects of both, somehow.

In the days of kayfabe, wrestling journalists always kept up the ruse, treating the act like a sport. But as public perception of the medium shifts from an athletic contest to high-impact theater, it's time for the people writing about it to follow suit.  

From the normal run of things, where each player is trying to create space for his teammates, everyone turns and looks to the winger to create something ex nihilo. At Arsenal, Gervinho was often asked to do this moment-forcing, and he struggled. Unshackled at Roma, he's thriving.

David Roth

 et al.

We are nearly out of baseball teams, and baseball season. To make the most of the (honestly kind of wearyingly predictable) teams left, let's look to the weird Corgi-shaped sluggers and try to ignore Tony La Russa's scowling ghost. Let's at least try.

Some good games, some bad games, the amazing Jaguars against the actualy amazing Broncos, all played comfortably in the shadow cast by the many problems of an increasingly, incredibly complicated entertainment.

Sportswriting as we know it more or less began in Chicago. From Black Sox to Three-Peats: A Century of Chicago's Best Sportswriting from the Tribune, Sun-Times, and Other Newspapers, a new anthology of Chicago sportswriting edited by the veteran columnist Ron Rapoport, shows how sportswriting grew up, and grew with the times, in the Windy City.

On the Champions League, aesthetics, branding, the vague but deeply felt subliminal effects of a great-looking soccer pitch and the profound, strange significance of groundskeeping.

Grantland Rice's famed "Four Horsemen" column about Notre Dame's college football team is one of the most storied and legendarily purple pieces of sportswriting ever. So we translated it into American English, in an attempt to figure out what it's actually about.

Sad parking lots, the joys of Russell Wilson running around terrified, and a children's book called J.J. Watt The Patriotic Violence Mountain. Also some predictions for the NFL's Week 5 slate of games.

Years after his last game with the Charlestown Chiefs, the team's reluctant star has stripped away everything he didn't need. What's left is just Ned Braden. A selection from the upcoming issue of The Classical Magazine.