Articles

We do not see Nyjah Huston moving through city streets—his filming missions are selective and nocturnal. They are movie sets lit by floods run on generators that growl and smell of petroleum. He skates with trucks rigidly tight, keeping his lines straight and landings perfect. Anything less requires a quick tick-tack adjustment—a, clunky, artless flourish and probable cause for editing that cuts landings as soon as his legs absorb the impact. Every time: feet wide, strategic, automatic. Soulless.

No one will give a shit about LeBron James in 100 years. The upside of eternity for LeBron, apart from the trust funds he leaves behind for his great-great-grandchildren, is death. But the same thing is true for Cleveland. Featuring a Q&A with Scott Raab.

In January of 2010, Neil Chamberlain left Brooklyn for a three-month tour of Muay Thai boxing camps in Thailand.  While abroad he kept an online chronicle of his experiences that was followed voraciously by his family and friends.  Neil returned from Thailand in early April; less than two weeks later he was dead at age twenty-eight, killed by a hit-and-run driver. It’s a great cliché to describe prose as “alive," but it’s a privilege to say it now, and to share Neil’s words and travels here. 

For most of the past decade, Daniel Bryan was, by general nerd consensus, the single best independent wrestler in America. But the WWE has built itself on chiseled, charismatic figures, and Danielson isn't that. Given WWE's lack of tolerance toward wrestler weed-smoking and Danielson's ridiculous physical abilities, I have to assume that he's not actually high all the time, or ever. But he sure does seem like it. He's a vegan because he's got some weird health issues. He sings backup on a song from the new Kimya Dawson album. He's a strange guy.

Bad contracts, the poisons that contaminated the NBA, were largely responsible for the lockout. They became emblems for David Stern’s “broken system” rhetoric. But there’s no way these contracts would exist without the fans asking for them. 

The last decade has seen an explosion of gay sports bars in America's large cities: Crew in Chicago, Gym Bar and Boxers in New York, Woofs in Atlanta, Sidelines in Ft. Lauderdale, and more. These bars are a coming out party for a long-standing subculture of out fans—and athletes—that have been trapped between competing stereotypes for decades. And on the business front, their success is undeniable.

Jose Reyes got a contract offer from the Miami Marlins that the New York Mets couldn't match, and so he left. It's not all that complicated. How the the Mets organization became the zombie-patrolled ruin it is today, on the other hand...

Avi Korine

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Justice was served, but it was no mere formality. Both of these guys swear that the rematch between Miguel Cotto and Antonio Margarito was up there for the most profound sports experiences of their lives. Magic stills happen in Madison Square Garden, and it doesn't have to be nice. 

Nils Wagner's by-the-bootstraps company, HoopMixTape, helped launch the public awareness of future young NBA players like John Wall, Derrick Rose, and Brandon Jennings. His videos have been viewed online more than 120 million times, and he has more than 125,000 YouTube subscribers.  In the landscape of sports programming, where high school athletics are the next frontier—and, indeed, become more commercialized by the year—Nils Wagner and his competitors’ dramatic hype and frequent dunk-and-crossover mash-ups provide what networks often don’t.

Reaction to the end of the NBA lockout has been couched in the either/or terms of fan elation (or revulsion). Did the lockout do irrevocable damage to the league's brand and bruise up David Stern's legacy? Or, was  this abrupt resolution, at nearly the exact point where yearning curdles into resentment, was perfectly timed to cash in on pent-up enthusiasm?  The more realistic response, is one of ambivalence.