Articles

For those who follow LSU, Arizona State, Texas and other near-perennial College World Series qualifiers, Rosenblatt Stadium had become a beautiful summer vacation home. But it had a much deeper meaning for the people of Omaha. For them, the polarizing decision to raze the ’Blatt and relocate its tenants has felt more like a high-stakes battle for the soul of a modest midwestern city.

Paris has never had a soccer team befitting its image of itself as the center of the world. For 40 years, Paris Saint-Germain Football Club has failed to live up to the lucrative standard of the rest of the city. Despite underperforming teams and a largely working-class fan base, the club has always seemed like it should give its owners a license to print money. The question then: can you gentrify a team? PSG did what unscrupulous developers have done for decades: They changed the rules, preyed on fears of crime, and cynically played for a newer, richer kind of fan. The fourth of a five-part series examining what happens to a football club when everyone’s eyes have turned to €€. 

Tom Scharpling continues his quest to get into the NHL, even though his beloved NBA is back and kicking. Today: the need to pick a team, the lure of tradition, and an upcoming field trip. 

Paris has never had a soccer team befitting its image of itself as the center of the world. For 40 years, Paris Saint-Germain Football Club has failed to live up to the lucrative standard of the rest of the city. Despite underperforming teams and a largely working-class fan base, the club has always seemed like it should give its owners a license to print money. The question then: can you gentrify a team? PSG did what unscrupulous developers have done for decades: They changed the rules, preyed on fears of crime, and cynically played for a newer, richer kind of fan. An in-depth examination of what happens to a football club when everyone’s eyes have turned to €€. 

Paris has never had a soccer team befitting its image of itself as the center of the world. For 40 years, Paris Saint-Germain Football Club has failed to live up to the lucrative standard of the rest of the city. Despite underperforming teams and a largely working-class fan base, the club has always seemed like it should give its owners a license to print money. The question then: can you gentrify a team? PSG did what unscrupulous developers have done for decades: They changed the rules, preyed on fears of crime, and cynically played for a newer, richer kind of fan. The third of a five-part series examining what happens to a football club when everyone’s eyes have turned to €€. 

Darts, currently in the middle of its world championship season, is a big deal. Big enough to have not one but two international showcases of note, and big enough to turn what's generally a barroom pastime into high drama. It's also proof that a sport can't afford to forget where it came from. 

Paris has never had a soccer team befitting its image of itself as the center of the world. For 40 years, Paris Saint-Germain Football Club has failed to live up to the lucrative standard of the rest of the city. Despite underperforming teams and a largely working-class fan base, the club has always seemed like it should give its owners a license to print money. The question then: can you gentrify a team? PSG did what unscrupulous developers have done for decades: They changed the rules, preyed on fears of crime, and cynically played for a newer, richer kind of fan. The second of a five-part series examining what happens to a football club when everyone’s eyes have turned to €€. 

Paris has never had a soccer team befitting its image of itself as the center of the world. For 40 years, Paris Saint-Germain Football Club has failed to live up to the lucrative standard of the rest of the city. Despite underperforming teams and a largely working-class fan base, the club has always seemed like it should give its owners a license to print money. The question then: can you gentrify a team? PSG did what unscrupulous developers have done for decades: They changed the rules, preyed on fears of crime, and cynically played for a newer, richer kind of fan. The first of a five-part series examining what happens to a football club when everyone’s eyes have turned to €€. 

Colombia's brutal history has taught Colombians to be wary of too much hope. The national soccer team has re-taught that lesson, too. But in Colombia, and on the pitch, things seem—slowly, and not always surely—to be changing.

Chauncey Billups didn't want to go to Los Angeles. But as he enters the twilight of a fascinating career, there really is no better place for Billups to be than the world capital of sunswept apocalypse.