Articles

David Roth

 et al.

In which a lawyer and a... non-lawyer figure out what an NLRB ruling means for the future of the NCAA, and the whole weird feudal endeavor that is college sports.

One of the world's great Scuba experiences happens to exist on Mickey Mouse's turf, which means that diving with the rays and sharks and Guitarfish at Epcot's 5.7 million gallon tank means being a Part Of [Their] World, minus an actual Little Mermaid.

The NCAA Tournament's appeal overlaps with the sentimental appeal of the underdog. Wichita State may well be about to make that old, sweet dream a lot less quaint, and a lot more real. How ready are we for this?

For all the recent nostalgia over the dearly departed Reagan-era Big East, all it takes is a trip to Madison Square Garden to confirm that the conference is still here, and still more or less itself.

In 1887, only two years after the English Football Association first permitted “professionals” to play for clubs, a German sociologist  published a book called Gemeinschaft und Gesselschaft. More than eight decades later, a British sportswriter published a book about Tottenham Hotspur called The Glory Game. The two books have more in common than you might think.

Michael Bradley might have been the best American player in European soccer. Instead, he decided to come home and play in the MLS. It's a big deal, for him and his league, even though the story's a long way from finished.

Major League Soccer is looking to expand, and the expansion Sacramento Republic FC wants to be a part of it. It'll be a lot of work, but the presence of an American soccer legend has helped them to see the goal clearly.

David Roth

 et al.

It's spring. Jason Giambi is leading, Ian Kinsler is taking umbrage, and Bartolo Colon is eating balloon animals at birthday parties. So, pretty much the usual.

Basketball just looks a lot easier when Paul George plays it than it usually does. That hasn't stopped him from working hard at it, which is just another reason why George is one of the NBA's truest must-watch stars.

Susan Cain's "Quiet:  The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking," destroys the myth that categorically extroverted qualities like "charisma" and "gregariousness" are requisite to leadership and performance. Jason Brickman is the NCAA assist-record challenging embodiment of that.